4 Co-op Videogames More Revealing Than Any Personality Quiz

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Determining compatibility with another human—whether for lifelong partnership, working relationship, or casual friendship—can be a sketchy process. We can look to OkCupid and similar matchmaking sites as prime examples of our continual need to supplement our search via technology. When you’ve found your 99% compatible there’s still the traditional process of “how many dates before the mask slips and the crazy comes out?” Even the most outgoing person begins to side with Charlotte Lucas‘ view of long-term relationships: “It is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life.”

Marrying strictly for money isn’t that great of an option even with improved 21st century divorce laws, so traits like altruism, humor, critical thinking, and propensity for violence are left to carry the load. Never fear—you don’t have to put on pants and face the outside world to test True Love (or friendship, or co-working.) Just look where you always have: your TV and/or computer.

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15 Gaming Influences: Where in Time is Carmen Sandiego?

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Do the videogames I play make me who I am or reflect who I am? Back in March, Belghast the Aggronaut posted a list of the top 15 games which influenced his playstyle today and I’ve been meaning to write the same list for ages. The more I look at my top 15 games, the more I realize they influenced my entire life more than just my playstyle. I have so much of me wrapped up in each game on my list that every one really deserves its own post.

So, my first stop is 1990 where we have just intercepted a time patrol crime alert!

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Let’s ask a little more from our games

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The conversation was over as soon as the defense became, “It’s supposed to be entertaining, so that’s good.” If you must have context, this was from a nice journalist who received a questionable command from PR but chose to demo their game regardless. This post is not about that journalist because the context could have been anything in the entertainment realm: books, movies, theatre, podcasts. I’ve heard the statement multiple times in multiple conversations, and every time it seems an incredibly low mark to hit. It’s safe to assume any entertainment media manifests because a creator thought it would entertain consumers.

There’s an entirety of existence waiting for you, everything from the smallest dancing particle to the limitless expanse of universe. In your own mind lie fewer boundaries and the possibility of everything that has been and could be, or never be. If your criteria is “be entertained”, how do you narrow down what is worthy of your time? If you review videogames with that criteria, how do you convey your experience to others?

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